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Liverpool youth claim bonspiel gold

[From left] Maggie Hadskis, Marah Mitton, Sophey Morris and Kylie DeViller. Hadskis, Mitton and DeViller won the U15 women’s provincial consolations in a bonspiel at the Liverpool Curling Club the weekend of Feb. 9-11.
[From left] Maggie Hadskis, Marah Mitton, Sophey Morris and Kylie DeViller. Hadskis, Mitton and DeViller won the U15 women’s provincial consolations in a bonspiel at the Liverpool Curling Club the weekend of Feb. 9-11. - Submitted

LIVERPOOL – Marah Mitton, Maggie Hadskis and Kylie DeViller walked away with gold medals from the U15 provincial consolations.
The provincial bonspiel took place at the Liverpool Curling Club the weekend of Feb. 9, 10 and 11.
Mitton is the skip, DeViller is the mate, Hadskis is second and Sophey Morris is the lead.
“(Sophey) has been out most of the season injured but was there cheering her team on,” said Jennifer Chase, head of membership with the Liverpool Curling Club.
As skip, Mitton calls the shots and reads the ice.
“When you’re calling the shot, you have to know where the rock’s going to land and where you should hold your broom for aim,” she said.
Mitton says it can be difficult not only because of how certain the call has to be, but also because all ice is different.
To prepare for a bonspiel like the one in Liverpool, Mitton, Hadskis and DeViller practise three times a week. A standard practice involves warming up with slides, doing hitting drills, drawing to the centre and doing balance drills.
“We normally finish off with a game against the other team,” said Mitton.
Mitton and Hadskis say they get nervous at bonspiels, but they battle their nerves with humour.
“I find it definitely effects how we play if we let the nerves get to us too much, so we have to always try to stay calm,” said Mitton.
Not only do the girls have to try to stay calm. They also have to be ready physically. Mitton and Hadskis say sweeping is by far the most challenging physical part of the sport. Muscle memory is involved as well and depends on how fast or slow the ice is at a particular club.
Sophey’s father, Rob Morris, is the coach and continued to coach the team after his daughter’s injury.
The start
Mitton and Hadskis, both from Liverpool, took up curling in Grade 4. The girls are now in Grade 8.
“I’ve always liked to try new things,” said Mitton about why she decided to try curling. “And I ended up really liking it.”
Hadskis started the sport because her mother suggested it might be something fun to do.
Both girls like curling for the social aspect, but Hadskis says the sport has taught her lessons beyond the ice. Those lessons have included etiquette and how to be well mannered.
“In curling it’s all about letting the other team go,” explained Hadskis.
Teams watch and learn from each other, too, she said. She says those lessons in etiquette and manners have transferred to the classroom and taught her to be more polite.
“It’s definitely different from other sports,” agreed Mitton.
Mitton and Hadskis both plan to continue to curl and would both like to eventually go to a juniors event. For now, they are hoping DeViller and Morris are still part of their team next season.
Mitton says taking home gold feels good because of how much the team has practiced all season.
“This year was probably our best year so far,” said Mitton, and Hadskis chimed in with her agreement. “And I think I had the most fun this year with these guys.”
 

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