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Dry spell good and bad for golf

Milton Campbell plays a hole at the White Point Golf Club.
Milton Campbell plays a hole at the White Point Golf Club.

WHITE POINT, N.S. — The dry and sunny summer that has hit the south shore with low record rainfall has been both a blessing and a struggle for golf courses in the area.

Milton Campbell, president of the White Point Golf Club, said they have had a great year for golfers hitting a round and expects the course to be able to extend the season even further because of a forecasted mild fall.

The course was busy on Sept. 16 as the club geared up for men’s night. The greens were as bright as ever against the sparkling blue backdrop of the ocean, a stark contrast against most grass throughout the drought.

“We’ve had quite a lot of golfers,” said Campbell.  “But it’s been a challenge to keep the green short and not tear up the brown.”

Evidence off the greens of the dry summer in the form of burned grass was there, but not as bad as it could be.

“We desperately need rain but sometimes the fog will help a little,” he said.  “But we have a great work crew who have been working hard to look after the greens.”

The course has seen a busy season of green fees or non-members as well.

“People are taking advantage of the warm, dry weather,” he said.

The golf club has 80 members and 30 junior members.

Milton Campbell, president of the White Point Golf Club, said they have had a great year for golfers hitting a round and expects the course to be able to extend the season even further because of a forecasted mild fall.

The course was busy on Sept. 16 as the club geared up for men’s night. The greens were as bright as ever against the sparkling blue backdrop of the ocean, a stark contrast against most grass throughout the drought.

“We’ve had quite a lot of golfers,” said Campbell.  “But it’s been a challenge to keep the green short and not tear up the brown.”

Evidence off the greens of the dry summer in the form of burned grass was there, but not as bad as it could be.

“We desperately need rain but sometimes the fog will help a little,” he said.  “But we have a great work crew who have been working hard to look after the greens.”

The course has seen a busy season of green fees or non-members as well.

“People are taking advantage of the warm, dry weather,” he said.

The golf club has 80 members and 30 junior members.

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