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Things are looking up for the Liverpool Curling Club

Things are looking up at the Liverpool Curling Club
Things are looking up at the Liverpool Curling Club

LIVERPOOL - For the first time in years, things are looking up for Liverpool’s curling club.

 A series of fundraising efforts and a membership drive have come together to make the club more vibrant, and attract new members.

John Armstrong is president of the club.

He says the club has gotten a handle on costs.

“Which means the amount of money we need to raise is down,” he says.

The Curling Club’s weekly Toonie Draw , which started earlier this year, has been  a success, and Armstrong says that is bringing in a steady source of revenue for the club.

And there are new members.

“We’ve got more curlers,” he says.

“Roughly an increase by about 30 per cent.”

The club held an open house recently, and his weekend it hosts the Icebreaker Tournament.

The club is also hosting a major junior curling tournament in February, which Armtrong says will bring in families.

“They usually stay in accommodations and buy meals. For that weekend there will probably be from 25 to 35 teams,” he says.

This year, the club also decided to host “ice cubes”, which are the youngest group of curlers, ages six or seven. It also hosts “little rocks”, which curl on Monday nights.

The club is also planning to host events to bring in money.

“We know we’re not sustainable unless we make the building useable all year round.”

The club is removing its carpet, which is about 40 years old.

“By doing that, it’s going to be more presentable so that possibly receptions for weddings and so on can be held there.”

There will be regular monthly dances, also, with live bands.

And the club will also host fun nights.

“We’ve got a committee looking in to how to use the club on a regular basis,” he says.

The club plans to put out an events calendar listing all of the events happening at the club.

“So we’re getting more organized that way.”

The Liverpool Curling Club opened in 1938.

 A series of fundraising efforts and a membership drive have come together to make the club more vibrant, and attract new members.

John Armstrong is president of the club.

He says the club has gotten a handle on costs.

“Which means the amount of money we need to raise is down,” he says.

The Curling Club’s weekly Toonie Draw , which started earlier this year, has been  a success, and Armstrong says that is bringing in a steady source of revenue for the club.

And there are new members.

“We’ve got more curlers,” he says.

“Roughly an increase by about 30 per cent.”

The club held an open house recently, and his weekend it hosts the Icebreaker Tournament.

The club is also hosting a major junior curling tournament in February, which Armtrong says will bring in families.

“They usually stay in accommodations and buy meals. For that weekend there will probably be from 25 to 35 teams,” he says.

This year, the club also decided to host “ice cubes”, which are the youngest group of curlers, ages six or seven. It also hosts “little rocks”, which curl on Monday nights.

The club is also planning to host events to bring in money.

“We know we’re not sustainable unless we make the building useable all year round.”

The club is removing its carpet, which is about 40 years old.

“By doing that, it’s going to be more presentable so that possibly receptions for weddings and so on can be held there.”

There will be regular monthly dances, also, with live bands.

And the club will also host fun nights.

“We’ve got a committee looking in to how to use the club on a regular basis,” he says.

The club plans to put out an events calendar listing all of the events happening at the club.

“So we’re getting more organized that way.”

The Liverpool Curling Club opened in 1938.

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