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Liverpool curling club may not open this year

Liverpool Curling Club president John Armstrong says the doors of the 80 yer old institution may not open this year.
Liverpool Curling Club president John Armstrong says the doors of the 80 yer old institution may not open this year.

LIVERPOOL - It should be celebrating its 80th anniversary this year, but instead, the Liverpool Curling Club may be shutting its doors due to lack of membership.

 John Armstong is president of the club. He says the organization’s remaining 30 members are struggling to figure out ways to open this fall, but the prospects are looking bleak.

 “We just haven’t got enough members,” says Armstrong. “Last year we had 30 seniors, and the operating costs are $40 thousand a year.”

 Armstrong says the club could survive if it had between 60 and 100 members, and possibly a little help from the Region of Queens Municipality.

 The remaining members are currently undertaking a membership drive, trying to attract new and former members to the club.

 “We have a list of all the old members that belonged they’re all going to get a phone call to find out if they’re interested,” he says. “If they’re not interested, why they are no longer int

 John Armstong is president of the club. He says the organization’s remaining 30 members are struggling to figure out ways to open this fall, but the prospects are looking bleak.

 “We just haven’t got enough members,” says Armstrong. “Last year we had 30 seniors, and the operating costs are $40 thousand a year.”

 Armstrong says the club could survive if it had between 60 and 100 members, and possibly a little help from the Region of Queens Municipality.

 The remaining members are currently undertaking a membership drive, trying to attract new and former members to the club.

 “We have a list of all the old members that belonged they’re all going to get a phone call to find out if they’re interested,” he says. “If they’re not interested, why they are no longer int

 To make matters worse, he says, the club has been slapped with a $900 electric bill for a twenty-day period when the club wasn’t even operating. Members are now trying to figure out of there is an electricity leak somewhere.

 The club is asking the Region of Queens Municipality for help, not for cash, but perhaps forgiving the water bill or taking over the snow plowing in winter.

  “We’re already in the process of having and meeting and going before them and trying to decide do you want to be the only community of this size in Nova Scotia that doesn’t have a curling club?”

 The club is also hoping for some help from the Emera Centre.

 “They have qualified people at the Emera Centre,” he says. “We  have to pay a fee now to when you set the ammonia in motion, you have to have a certified licenced person to oversee that procedure for safety purposes, so we’ll ask them for maybe possibly your people could come over.”

 Currently, that service is performed – for a fee – by a refrigeration company in Kentville.

  The club also has a committee looking into how other curling clubs, like those in Barrington and Digby, manage to stay open.

 The club does rent out its premises to groups and organizations, but Armstrong says it’s looking for ideas from the public for more uses for the facility when curling is not in season.

 And, he says, people who take up a membership would probably not regret the decision.

 “We had six new members this year, all six were retired people who just moved into the area. It’s a place for them to meet people and get acquainted. I think it would be sorely missed,” he says.

“It is a place where not only do you go to go to curl, there are social events on weekends and night times it can be a viable place for both curling and sociable things.”

 He says the 30 current members of the club are becoming burnt out, not only with maintaining the building, but with constant volunteer fundraising and trying to attract more members.

 

 

The club is hoping to meet with the region soon to ask for some short -term assistance.

 Without it, he says, he is not optimistic.

  “Without municipal help it doesn’t look good.”

 

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