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Going an extra mile

Tanya Long, owner of Veinot’s Print, says the Liverpool-based business has adapted to fill a hole in the community. Photo printing is now available thanks to a recent purchase of a professional photo printer.
Tanya Long, owner of Veinot’s Print, says the Liverpool-based business has adapted to fill a hole in the community. Photo printing is now available thanks to a recent purchase of a professional photo printer. - Submitted

Veinot’s Print fills photo printing need in Queens County after kiosks removed

LIVERPOOL – For the past 45 years, Veinot’s Print Limited in Liverpool has been adapting to ever-evolving customer needs and keeping up with technological changes. The recent purchase of a Canon professional photo printer is a prime example.
Although the demand for print photos has declined since the days of 35-millimetre cameras, says Veinot’s Print’s owner and operator Tanya Long, many people still want to print photos, especially as gifts.
A few years ago, Veinot’s Print provided the same service but stopped because the local Superstore had photo kiosks. The photo printer Veinot’s had at the time printed great quality photos, but took nearly five minutes to print an 8x10, says Long. It was just not a quick turnaround, so Veinot’s sent customers to the local Superstore for prints, she says.
Recently, however, the Superstore removed the Kodiak photo kiosks, presumably because of the expensive upkeep, says Long.
“I did some research on purchasing an actual kiosk when the Superstore removed their machines,” says Long. “And they cost between $10,000 to $15,000 each, plus the cost of the refills.”  
With new advances in technology all the time, these units would likely become discontinued after a few years.
So, Veinot’s Print purchased a professional photo printer instead, allowing the business to offer prints at a reasonable cost to customers. Unlike the former printer, this one prints an 8x10 in less than a minute, says Long. It is also wireless, so customers can print directly to it or can send photos via email or bring them in on an USB stick.  
“A lot of times photos that are downloaded from Facebook or other internet sources are not great quality,” says Long. “We can help make adjustments, so your photos look better than a kiosk.”
These are just some of the technological changes that Veinot’s Print has been keeping up with because, as Long says, changing times means expanding their products to meet customers’ needs. Previously, the focus was on providing forms, letterhead, business cards and envelopes. Now, Long says, Veinot’s offers labels (rolled and flat), signage (indoor and outdoor), custom printed clothing, vinyl lettering, booklets, calendars, banners, programs and much more. And, if they can’t do it onsite, Long says they have a vast array of suppliers that offer almost everything you can imagine to their Queens County customers.
One of the best parts about the business, says Long, is having it in a small town. It means you are part of a larger support network, she says. Other businesses use Veinot’s services, and Veinot’s does the same in return. She says it makes for better connections with her customers.
“If I am at a hockey game or grocery store, it’s a great thing when someone asks about a printing service or product that I can provide,” says Long. “In a small town, it’s mostly about relationships you have, and the extra mile that you are willing to take to meet their printing needs.”

Learn more at http://www.veinotsprint.ca

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